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a group of political science students from san jose state who watched the debate together last night downtown. after it was all over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room, yeah, they had to admit, romney gets the slight edge. >> overall, romney from my perspective did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> a political science professor from san jose state telling us, she thinks romney will get a nice bump in the polls from that debate. she adds whether that bumps come in the all-important swing states where the race is still very tight that, remains to be seen. >>> here's a question, historically how much impact do presidential debates have on an election when it's all said and done? we asked that question to a professor of political science at santa clara university. >> that's a good question. in 2004, john kerry won the first debate against president bush. and in 1984, reagan stumbled in the first debate against mondale and it didn't seem to hurt them very much. it will be interesting to see as the polls c
. >>> a controversial proposed study off the coast has environmentest angry and worried. ktvu's health and science editor john fowler is here where pg&e's plan is creating a lot of concern for marine mammals. >> reporter: 40-mile stretch of the ocean. from here down to south of pismo beach. beginning next month 12 days of blasting the water here, every 15 seconds with super loud sound. >> reporter: the power plant could be at risk from undersea earthquake faults. >> the state called for the study and we are committed with working with them. >> reporter: penetrate the ocean floor, echoes reveal faults but it could also hurt marine mammals. >> we will have safe protection zones. >> reporter: there will be only temporary effects on marine life but i obtained this report, there would be significant and unavoidable harm to hundreds of marine mammals. >> we have seen beachings of marine mammals around the world following large noises. >>> they say the state used better and more recent science that are better, less risky methods to explore the faults. >> you can get better, reliable data by going at it a
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for the 408 and 669 area codes? no, what
jose and among those, political science professors. i think mitt romney did a great job, obama looked a little off his game. i think mitt romney did a better job tonight. >> i think the winner is the president because he is the president and his opponent has to be able to say why he should be better than the incumbent and i don't think that was necessarily done tonight. >> and a debate feels 6 5% feels mitt romney won compared to 2 5% for the president. and 48% for mitt romney, compared to 2 5% for the president. >>> and fact statements you will find that on our website www.ktvu.com. >>> they will replace the death penalty with life in prison without parole. here are the -- here is the news about that. >>> and there is a dispute that happened in the city of glenn cove neighborhood. ktvu channel 2 morning news wopping wong joins us with more about the man accused of opening fire on neighbors. >> he said the sister martin he is a former marine and you can see the marine flag flying out in front of his home. the home of the toe people he shot was vallejo. i want to show you video as the
of political science students. the president's own staff tonight said romney won the debate when it came to style points gop the students there agree? >> for the most part, yes, they do agree. about 120 political sciences students came here to watch the debate along with some professors and some alumni. the general consensus was romney had a slight edge over the president in terms of his performance at the debate tonight. >> two rebuild america. >> more effective. more charismatic. >> i will lower taxes on middle income families. >> governor romney held his own. actually, i was surprised. >> reporter: after the debate was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room felt that romney had won. >> romney did a great job in presenting himself in like a very positive way. even though, like, the answers that obama gave were very pro democratic, pro public education. >> overall, romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> this way it's his do or die moment. >> reporter: melinda jackson says ro
request for an interview. >> up next remarkable science behind creating a human heart. >> and there i >>> findings of a study out of uc berkeley are raising concerns about the chemical known as bpa showing mothers with high levels had less active thoi roids and the thyroids of newborn boys were more active. there is no impact found among newborn girls and this is commonly found in other containers and in the lining of food and beverage can autos people understand how easy to break a heart but how about making one? there is a group of researchers developed a blueprint they say could have a profound affect. >> through a microscope there is no mistaking beating. these heart cells were created in a bay area lab and have helped researchers unlock secrets of how a heart becomes a heart it helps to know what switches exist how they're connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so this team set out to map the genetic switches locked inside of the dna of embryonic stem cells to see how it becomes a hearts cell. >> this is setting right switches to turn genes on or off. >> to begin, the re
the change for winter 2012. >> it's kind of a science. >> jummy the -- you meet the man behind "wicked" and how they turn the stage into >> discussion impossible tax hike under way and the impact could have on middle-class families. a man dies in police custody and is now being rolled homicide. allegations of illegal gambling and internet cafes. details on the claims being made by the maryl >> the weather channel will begin naming not or the winter storms this upcoming winter season to better communicate the threat and timing of a significant storms' impact. instead of calling things snow- tober or snopocalypse. the list includes athena, brutus, draco, and magnus. >> the most important things to look out will be accumulation and the combination of wind which can produce significant impact on the public. listen differentiate -- this will differentiate the system they will be using. tom tasselmyer? >> "bob's on teh way." we start talking about snowstorms three weeks in advance. >> brutus is coming! >> e tu? [laughter] >> pretty soon we will be naming rain storms. i don't know. >> we will
for concern for moms and their newborns, especially boys. a report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: jenna, like many moms, worries about producting her young kids from chemical contamination. especially the effects of the the chemical, bpa, found in plastics. >> i'm avoiding plastic in general. we try to drink out of glass. all of our water bottles, we take away with us, are reuseable. they're glass or metal. >> reporter: a new study suggests that moms may be passing along effects of bpa to their kids. in a study of 500 pregnant women, those with the highest levels of bpa have lower thyroid levels. and so did their infant sons. why only boys? scientists aren't sure. but they see the same thing in animal studies. thyroid hormones help control many systems in the body and can affect childhood development. >> if bpa is affecting the levels during pregnancy, this could be affecting the learning, memory and behavior of children later in life. >> reporter: bpa is part of many widely used plastic products. including can liners in certain bottles. most americans
before i can go home? sometimes you need to burn everything to begin a new and here there are no science the deaths are not as severe the pure ifkification not complete. to let the natural of the sun have it's way with me. to feel the tips of grass force through the ashes of earth the complicated earth that seechls soft at the surface and yet so deep. that is how i feel the hidden layers of hardness, liquid and flame. can anything survive at the core. must i always hold people at a distance never let them settle inside me. mother there is not enough room for me in your womb. that's why i left. to seek a home a place where i could grow. 165 miles i crieds, 165 times i missed you today. 165 meals that did not satisfy. 165 was not the number of my dorm room. 165 dollars for a 1 way ticket. 651 the area code home. >> this is a record. phone rings, a set in mother tone asks, what are you eating, how are you getting around? warns me to lock all the locks on the door. my voice plays over and over half truths with fragmented vietnamese. i don't tell her that the locks have already been locked t
acting unusually and all bats. under scoring treatment can save lives. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu news, back to you. >>> new cases in the allegations of a teacher for failing report malstation reports. notes taken by the principal were made public yesterday. santa clara county officials say the documents reveal the principal had enough information to get the teacher, chandler, from his althoughed victim to report possible allegations three months before she did. she waited until chandler was accused of molesting another child to report him. >> obviously we believe the notes are the most compelling evidence that we have of the student reporting the situation. >> now, we tried contacting the attorney for the principal but have not heard back. they take the allegation seriously and cooperating fulliy with law enforcement. >>> investigators are looking into what caused a car crash that killed a driver today. it happened before 11:00 from interstate 880 to highway 237. the driver of the toyota crashed into a concrete divider and the car burst into flames. the driver died a
will share the award with haroche of france. the rile academy of sciences says they opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics. >>> a look at the weather and see where that rain is out there. >> depends on where you are it could be anywhere with it being closest to the coast that would be a better area to see scattered light showers during morning hours. let's look at what is going on the embarcadero san francisco back to the bay bridge looks quiet. live doppler 7 hd, this is what it looks like right now and let me flatten this out a little, as i do, you will be able to see how close it is to the coast. about 17 mile there is as we head toward -- 15 to 17 miles -- we'll put it into motion, it is dissipating as it heads north, the chunk of low pressure starting to move more towards northwest which means good sign that most of this activity is going to stay well out over the ocean. don't be surprised if a spray sprinkle or two gets along the sonoma marin county coast this morning. we are running in the 40s napa, santa rosa everybody else in the 50s. thick fog north bay valleys. mo
-- nobel prize in physics. he is originally from sacramento and received a bachelor of science from uc berkeley. he's now a physicist at the university of colorado in boulder. both judges credit them for inventing ground-breaking methods to observe the properties of quantum parols while preserving their quantum properties. >>> ahead closer look at why investors are feeling down on wall street. >>> and what happened late this morning for an amazing jump from the edge of space. >>> stocks are down after global economic growth and poor expectations for corporate earnings seasons with kicks off after the closing bell. dow down 98, nasdaq down 45, s&p down 12. >>> high winds today derailed plans for an man to launch a death defying 23-mile free fall in new mexico. former military parachutist baumgartner is on a quest to become the first sky diver to break the sound barrier. he planned to ride a capsule carried bay balloon into the stats fear then jump. but the balloon is so delicate it can only take flight of winds of two miles an hour or less. the 43-year-old now says he will try again. >>
the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate treatment can save lives. he
details tonight about the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate trea
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the beating cells they began watch
provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the first presidential debate is behind them, but the two sides went at it again today. republicans said their man took it to the president in the denver duel. the obama camp charged the truth got trampled in the process. >> la night i thought was a great opportunity for the american people to see two very different visions for the country. and -- (applause) -- and i think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. i said the president's vision is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter
signed the bill and said, quote, these have no basis in science or medicine. they will now be relegated to the dust bin of quackery. >> an oakland man is one of 23 winners so called genius grants and is a family independence initiative after a challenge from mayor jerry brown taking a different approach to help poor families instead of giving aid it helps them figure out their own paths towards self sufficient. >> we're looking at character loans so that if you don't meet other criteria, there are other criteria you can access low interest loan autos the family independence initiative helped about 800 families and he plans to use a portion of the $500,000 money to expand the program to other country autos coming up next, there is a big new layoff announcement from silicon valley. hundreds of people about to lose their job autos stage is set tonight for first presidential debate. and voting against underway. >> there is a progress report on the new bay bridge. the lock is run to opening day. stay with us. >>> good evening, there is a packed house tonight. emotions are really on edge. abc
place winner of the broad come master's science competition in washington dc. she will take home $6,000 for her project on eye muscles and vision. santa clara brothers were two of the top 30 finalists in that competition. they studied star brightness using a digital camera and a telescope. >>> well, oote his chance for a vacation destination. his vision to turn one hawaiian island into a sort of peach. rosemary orozco will tell us how much cooler it's going to be trm ing to be tomorrow vo: for years, sacramento politicians have chopped away funds for our schools. today, we're forty-seventh out of fifty in per-pupil funding. now these politicians say unless we send more tax dollars to sacramento, they'll cut education again. here's a new approach. prop thirty-eight sends billions in new education dollars straight to our local schools, and guarantees the politicians can't touch it. thirty-eight will restore the education cuts from sacramento. so remember this number. thirty-eight. on their own are amazing, but press out some biscuit dough, add some sauce and some pepperoni and cheese
: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos? can i get two sausage burritos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again, it has been dave giocolo's life the past three months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely measured 1,000 calories a day. a fast food daily only. how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university in st. louis. trying to understand why fast food leads to weight gain and diseases like diabetes and hypertension. at some point, though, research on rats alone is not enough. somebody has to eat the food? >> ultimately, it has to come to people. >> reporter: and so, a radio ad, that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500, depending on how long it would take. >> once i got into work, i called right away. >> reporter: so did nurse, dawn freeman. >> it probably took a month, to just get -- >> reporter: to get approved? >> to get approved. >> reporter: so, they ate every day, from one of these five restaurants, until their weight went up
and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> google and a group of publishers announced a settlement over diggal copyrights. they scanned -- digital cop rights. they said it -- copyrights. they said they will get to choose which books are included. >>> san francisco authorities apprehended a man who jumped bail after a guilty verdict in a scam. jay shah disappeared last month and was arrested yesterday. he is one of five charged with draining the equity out of three condos by creating flaweddially ownership -- fraudulent ownership documents. >>> it is called called the greed bus. why it rolled into the bay area and who it is targeting in the election. >> and a link between three cups of coffee or more a day and a condition that could effect your eyes. ñçbÑ >>> a political movement called stop the greed bus tour came to oakland today, they respect to get the greed out of politics and targeting the billionaire coke brothers. proposition 32, the measure on the ballot that would ban contributions to political candidates. >> how dare the coke brothers come into my communit
produce. in these fields lies a conflict over the science this fifth generation former uses. >> by buying these seeds we use much less herbicides and sometimes not at all. >> reporter: the seeds are genetically modified to resist insects and require less water. >> the only way we can survive in california is we have to be on the cutting edge of the latest technology. >> reporter: at the strauss family farm, organic dairy farmer albert strauss is pushing back against genetically modified technology. >> i have my own concerns about what affects it has on land, what affects it has on animals. >> reporter: he worries that bio engineering crops can contamination organic crops like his cow's feeds. these two california farmers represent the two sides of this war. people have if right to know if their foods is made from gmo. >> we're saying put it on the label and let people make choices for themselves about what they buy and eat. >> reporter: but opponents say requiring labels on genetically modified foods will make people think they are not healthy. >> by putting a scary sounding label on food
for his work. and this could change the course of science, seems less likely to change this researcher. >> and i'm a basic scientist. >> i will predict when he wins a nobel prize it will not change him one iota. >> and the mad dash to grab a good deal on black friday may be a waste of time. there are shopper that's do not get lowest prices on friday after thanksgiving. prices for many gifts are qlor at other times. and retailers select just a few items to dur us n walmart teeming fourp a card that is called blue bird and saying it will allow users to avoid increases fees and ause -- allows users to send money through a smart phone app. and there are google could be getting into the credit card business. >> which companies might be spying on us. >>? there is a house intelligence committee calling two tech companies a national security threat n a report throat that wallway and zp have links to china's government and goes on to say they can be using technology to spy on the united states and recommends the u.s. government block mergers involving those companies and warns contractors and b
political science professor david baggin says with democratic dominant california pretty much in the bag, the president's really here for one purpose. >> we're a wealthy state. we're the biggest donor state. we're the state that both sides, even though we're a heavily democratic state, both sides are going to come out and take advantage of that silicon valley money, hollywood money, that california gold. >> reporter: sharon hoffman is one of the handful of folks who paid top dollar to chat with the president in an intimate setting. and she is thrilled. >> it's a roundtable that is actually taking place apparently at a square table where he is going to talk and answer questions for approximately an hour about anything that the folks there want to talk about. so i'm really excited. it's a real treat and a privilege and really an honor. >> reporter: again, we understand that event is expected to last for about an hour. you can see the secret service continues to be on stand by here. now from here the president will travel about six blocks up to the bill graham civic auditorium, where he wil
. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overuse that word. >> you can't overuse it too much. >> and hug, too. >> o
. >> reporter: but u.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewe
.s. political science professor cook says the romney campaign has been playing the expectations game both ways. >> coming out the conventions until now. certainly for the romney campaign hasn't been positive and they made the argument, wait until the debates come around. >> reporter: cook says romney has an advantage by simply appearing on stage with a sitting president. and romney could take advantage as the debate makes it to the economy. voters will have their chance to decide with two more presidential debates to follow this month. in san francisco, ken pritchett, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and you can watch that debate live right here on ktvu channel 2 this wednesday. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. followed by a special edition of ktvu news. >>> a new analysis shows a record 23.7 million latinos will be eligible to vote in the upcoming election. that is more than 20% from 2008. the hispanic research says that the turn out is usually smaller than that of whites and african americans about 50%. that could be because eligible latino voters are younger and fewer younger people vote. >>> and i
schoolers to pursue science and engineering using only digital cameras and telescopes, they studied the brightens of stars and how it varies over times. >> one of the many types when an amateur astronomer can help the scientific community more than a professional can. >>> - - >> they find out tonight if they win. >>> complaints about a notorious foreclosure process are already dropping as the nation's landmark settlement is just about to go in effect. the deals between states and the largest lenders starts tomorrow. complaints about dual tracking dropped by 50% last month. that's when banks begin foreclosure proceedings at the same time as they're working on loan modifications. that practice is restricted under this new settlement. >>> we are following development news in hayward coming up in two minutes the new detail we're uncovering about a serious shooting just moments after officers arrive. >>> this couple dedicated they're lives to feeding the homes. but now they're ready to step aside and the question is, who's going to take over their job? mother nature's cool like that. mo
. most people understand how easy it is to break a heart but how about making one? t health science reporter carolyn johnson looks at blue print on how we treat heart and print on how we treat heart and heart disease >> even through a microscope there is no miss taking the rift mick beating. living heart cell were created in a bay area lab and help researchers unlock the secret of how a heart becomes a heart. >> helps to have a blue print. to know what switches exist. how they are connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so bruno and his team at san francisco glad stone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked inside the dna of of stem cell to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> with these the modification are doing is they are setting the right switches to turn gene on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >>reporter: to begin researchers jeffrey alexander coax millions of stem cell taken from mice into becoming beating heart cell, process didn't in petrie dish and they mimic the environment in the woom. not always a pre-s
want to see it as it moves from lax to the california science center. police warn they will close most sidewalks along the route for safety reasons. >>> new information about a san jose principal accused of not reporting allegations of sexual abuse by a teacher. the evergreen schoolteacher released notes showing a second grade student told principal that a teacher blindfolded her and put something in her mouth. now prosecutors say the principal should have reported that to the police and child protective services. the teacher allegedly molested another student three months later and was arrested. >>> 6:25. california's money problems are forcing more student tsz to go -- students to go to college out of state. uc and csu schools already pack the students from other states that pay more tuition here. they are cutting enrollment for california residents they is frustrating for those that would rather stay here in california. >> here in california tuition is going up every year every month. it's getting expensive. >> colleges in oregon, washington state, arizona, and ohio are aggressively
puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. abc7 health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulne
in their food. so are we. we want to provide fact-based information to consumers that have some basis in science. but even the proponents of prop 37 agree that would be putting skull and cross bones on the label. that's when the founder of the proposition says. scientists agree that genetically en neared food are safe. even the american medical association voted to say that there is no concern. >> but the concern is that there is not enough research being done, things like allergens and what not. these products have been around for a couple of decades about but maybe that's not enough. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies done. and as you pointed out, they have been in the food supply for decades. we have eaten trillions and trillions pound of genetically engineered food. this is about prop 37. don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged voters to reject it. >> okay. we are talking a lot about labeling. >> right. >> you said you had other concerns. you said out of the gate that this was not just about labeling. what are the other
are safe, they have been endorsed by the national academy of sciences, the world health organization and the american medical association voted at the annual meeting three months ago in june that there is no special labeling needed for bioengineering food. >> a lot of concern is that there is not enough research that has been done. things like allergens and whatnot. the products have been around a couple of decades but maybe that is not enough to know long- term effects. >> there have been studies done, more than 400 studies and they have been in the food supply for 20-plus years and we have eaten trillions and trillions of servings. there has been no scientifically based problems with this food. and really, you know, this is more than just a debate about genetically engineered food. this is about proposition 37. about a measure on the ballot on november 6th and people who have looked at it not just our campaign, don't believe me, but the overwhelming majority of editorial boards in california have urged the voters to reject that. >> okay, we are talking a lot about labeling. >> yeah
the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with h.i.v. every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condoms. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more vulnerable to contract
science reporter carolyn johnson. >>reporter: applause from san francisco doctor reached kyoto, japan. he celebrated the news of the nobel by teleconference with his colleague at the glad stop institute. >> thank you very much again everybody. >>reporter: 6 years ago he discovered way to turn adult stem cell into the equivalent of embryo stem cell that can be coaxed into becoming any kind of human cell in the body. it provides alternative to harvesting stem cell from human embryo. in exclusive ierview withs in 2009 the doct td me that t eicalebateover emyo stem cl had held drive his research. >> so that's why and how i got interested in reprogramming. reporter: his colleag said the technique led to mainly advance including the ability to create these beating heart cell in a dish and providing powerful new way to study disease. >> at glad stone we focus on heart scene. brain disease and viral disease. in each area we have used his technology and s discovery to make mainly gain. >>reporter: cell are known as induced stem cell or i p s cell. the doctor believes they will be used
the science today in the upper 50s along the coastline climbing to the low seventies for some of your more inland areas. temperatures still falling below the seasonal average. you will continue with a pretty quiet weather pattern of clouds conditions and cooler temperatures as we transition to the rest of the work week so full details coming up on that my next report. cussed taken out to satellite radio we to have a lot of cloud cover affecting the peninsula the coastline. we are seeing for novato. just over a mile for those of you driving a brown and napa. he's pretty foggy out there in the north that certainly be aware of that and be mindful of the cars in front of you. again we will see a mix of sun and clouds. again temperatures in the upper 60s low seventies in the south bay's 70 for sunday fell 72 expected in campbesunn6c coming out of marin county. no props for the east shore freeway southbound 68 0 c. looks good coming out of walnut creek. interstate 280 moves well between san jose and cupertino. issues with visibility i have checked with the c h p no accidents to report in fact th
that this was discovered in 1923 beef published his findings on the online publication of science journal. he saw this first as a graduate student and this creature was about the weight of a house cat. about 1 million, 2 million years ago. the paleontologist describes is as somewhat of a bird. perhaps with a vampire characteristic. it is pretty unusual. we will take a quick break. we will be back with more toward this live look toward westbound looking decent. >> welcome back. contra costa are saying that more birds have tested positive for west nile. this recent heat wave is causing the spread. and residents should be taking preventative measures. so they do not be infected. the ctc saying that these six birds and a chicken were found in brentwood. pleasantville, walnut creek. that chicken was found avgroup in oakland. and make sure to not touch any of dead birds. they could usually be infected. >> a politica--this man is being held possibly shooting his neighbors between vallejo. and they were found dead in their front yard. this was a 45 minute standoff between police. this was the 17th/18th h
death in 20 years. our health and science editor john fowler tells us why it's an international first for an american and what it means for bay area residents. >> reporter: it happened somewhere in south contra costa county, where freeway overpasses offer ideal homes for colonies of mexican free tail bats. the species linked to this case of rabies. >> once the symptoms develop, it's universally fatal. >> after a bite or exposure to wild animal, the incubation phase is two to six months. >> reporter: health officials say the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat, quote, flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the gentleman who died of rabies went over and stuck his hand in the plastic bag and most likely was bitten. >> reporter: said to be a bay bridge contractor, he never reported the bite in march, took civilian work in iraq, and became infectious. the cdc says he flew home to contra costa county june 14th. four days later, san francisco to bangkok for two weeks vacation, had close contact with two people, flew back to
. the delivery system puts the technology in the hands of women themselves. health and science reporter carolyn johnson has more. >>> it's estimated 3,000 women around the world are infected with - every day. a imagine of those cases are in sub sahara, africa. but now this team in menlo park are developing a gel they believe will cut those numbers dramatically. >> it's a two-part gel. when applied to the site, it will stick for such a long time, at the same time it is two drugs, one effective against hiv and the other effective. >> it is to protect women during intercourse from hiv and hsv, a form of genital herpes also rampant in africa. it would be an alternative in male-dominated cultures that sometimes discourage the use of condemns. >> therefore you want to empower the women to take charge of their own health. >> the project recently received a boost from the national institute of health. in july it awarded them a half million dollars grant to fund the research for two years. >> they believe the combination therapy could be particularly effective because hsv-2 infections leave women more v
--had a science lab as well as the oakland buildings. >> we were sitting in a restaurant just trying to have a nice dinner and enjoy ourselves. they picked up three chairs and a table and through a plate glass window. >> police did not know why the vandals attacked restaurants and businesses and the city hall. they're still assessing the amount of damage that was done. no arrests have been made at this time. >> a six year-old girl is dead and two other people were injured as they were struck in the minivan. saturday at the parking lot and st. andrew's catholic church three pedestrians were suffering from life- threatening injuries. the 60 + taken to the hospital where she died. the driver of the vehicle did not stay behind. >> assemblyman terry hill and sambar no mayor are calling on a judge today to reject the request. they seek a month-long suspension of the hearing for the pipeline outbreak cost. this allowed pg&e to finish the settlement negotiations pertaining to the blast that killed eight people and destroyed dozens of homes. >> the blue angel streak across the san francisco bay as yo
and science teachers to improve our education, doubling our exports, all those things that will help create jobs as we move forward and strengthen our economy. i was struck by kevin's answer about the fact that once again the romney campaign says they really don't have time to discuss the specifics of their tax plan. and, you know, this is a $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy. >> we also haven't heard the specifics of what the president prepared to do in terms of spending cuts as well. >> i don't think that's true. if you look at the budget plan that the president is outlining, $4 trillion spending cut plan that deals with making sure that our tax code is fair and that those that are on the upper end of that tax code are pay iing a little bit more. let's be clear, mitt romney's $5 trillion tax plan isn't hard to explain because of the time. it's hard to explain because of the math. the math doesn't add up. $5 trillion isn't paid for. what that requires, as economic studies have shown, is that mitt romney will have to raise taxes on middle class families. >> speaking of middle class familie
. and then for these, these are the breakthrough awards, these are based fully on science, innovation, products that have done something that no other product has done before. and we actually work it out with te dermatologists and chemists. we make sure these are legit. >> they've been scientifically tested and approved. >> completely. >> let's take a look at, starting first with the real weightless foundation from georgio armani, apparently five different oils instead of water or powder. >> and you know how foundation can feel thick and heavy, this one uses all the different oils which you think would be greasy, but they're really light oils, they evaporate on the skin, so you get the pure pigment. it's maestro foundation. >> amazing. >> those who suffer from r rosasia, there is no medical cure for this, but you did find this cream can be helpful. >> there's no cream over the counter for this. and what happens is there's too many blood cells underneath the surface of the skin and too reactive. so this aven cream, it's french. >> anti-redness. >> right. >> for chronic redness. it has a protein
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